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In Focus: Senior Airman Quishauwn Gaines

Senior Airman Quishauwn Gaines, aviation resource manager in the 466th Fighter Squadron at Hill Air Force Base, Utah

Senior Airman Quishauwn Gaines, aviation resource manager in the 466th Fighter Squadron at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Erica Webster)

HILL AIR FORCE BASE, Utah – “I’m a musician,” said Senior Airman Quishauwn Gaines. “I play the piano, guitar, and I love to sing.”

While in high school, Gaines learned to play by ear and expanded his musical talent by teaching himself the piano and most recently, the guitar.

“I can listen to the music and then play what I’ve heard,” Gaines said. “I think being a self-taught musician is pretty cool.”

Fortunately, Gaines isn’t shy about sharing his passion of music. He’s performed in churches, weddings, and with cover bands around Utah.

“When I was active duty, I used to volunteer with the public affairs office and sing the national anthem,” Gaines said. “I’ve probably done more than 50 retirement ceremonies.”

Prior to joining the 419th Fighter Wing as a reservist, Gaines previously served on the Honor Guard at Bolling Air Force Base in D.C., assisting with visiting dignitaries, providing honors at Arlington National Cemetery and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, and even an event at the White House.

“I enjoyed my time with the Honor Guard, but I wanted to come back to Utah,” Gaines said. “I love hiking. The first time I was here I didn’t take advantage of it and once I left, I found I missed it.”

Currently an aviation resource manager with the 466th Fighter Squadron, Gaines found his full-time employment as a civil servant working at the 309th Software Maintenance Group, which plays into his educational background in criminal justice and communication, and his current studies at Weber State University in configuration management.

During his time with the Air Force, he’s focused on using the opportunities around him to help build his career, both in and out of uniform.

“It’s pretty cool how everything translates over. I don’t feel like my time in the Air Force will ever go to waste because I can apply it somewhere else,” Gaines said. “I always try to tell Airmen, you’ve got the resources here. Just take it one day at a time and reach your goals.”